Four Foods to Eliminate Irritation

For the past two weeks, I’ve been fighting a losing battle against anger. There are a lot of changes taking place in my life. Unfortunately, despite my best intentions, I find that I constantly butt heads with certain people in certain situations. I’m sure you know the feeling. It seems as if once one thing is squashed and settled, then another thing pops up in its place. Ughh!

 

What’s more, I feel like there are moments where my usual methods of dealing with stressful situations don’t seem to be working as well. The answer is to let go and let be. It sounds very airy but it isn’t. I find that a lot of my frustration stems from resistance. We all have our own beliefs and experiences that we cannot shake no matter what. They shape who we are and how we react. There are certain situations and people who we will not synch with despite our best intentions because of those experiences and beliefs. So find your tribe, whoever they may be, and learn to respectfully walk away from the ones that you don’t mesh well with. Okay that’s my  sermon for today 😉.

When I have those irritating moments, I like to use the stress-busting tools that I discussed here. Sometimes, I like to just stop what I’m doing for five minutes to glance out the window. What I’m trying to say is changing a small thing can be valuable in terms of dealing with bigger issues.

As far as diet goes, I like to make sure that I have a lot of calcium-rich foods. Low levels of calcium may affect your mood. So please feel free to indulge in some broccoli, soybeans, and kale. Here are some other foods I thrive on when I feel a little too heated:

 

Bananas

Let me start by dispelling a very widespread belief that many of us grew up with regarding bananas. Yes, bananas do have serotonin’s precursor tryptophan, but no, they will not improve your mood because of it. Unfortunately, most foods containing tryptophan like bananas must compete with other amino acids for access to the brain and the serotonin doesn’t cross that blood-brain barrier. That’s why you crave carbs when stressed out—high carbohydrate foods increase the tryptophan ratio and allow more serotonin to your brain, which alters your mood for the better. So why the hell are we even talking about bananas? Well because bananas have other vitamins and nutrients that are beneficial for enhancing your mood such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, and phosphorus. This fruit is an antioxidant that is rich in vitamin A and B-vitamins. I like to mix banana puree into my baked goods like muffins or mix it in the occasional smoothie. Other times, I use it as an after dinner topping on my dessert.

Black beans

If I do one thing with this blog, that one thing will be having you walk away with a total lovefest with pulses like lentils, chickpeas, and black beans. Black beans, like other pulses, are a good source of protein, fiber, and iron. They also contain folate and magnesium. Some studies indicate that folate deficiency is linked with conditions such as depression and I talk about the benefits of magnesium here. Definitely a plus when dealing with daily irritants. But what makes black beans special is that they contain a higher amount of antioxidants than other beans. I love black beans in quesadillas, sandwiches, and salads.

 

Sourdough bread

Unrefined whole grains are a great source of carbohydrates and, as previously mentioned, that may promote that good mood that we’re seeking. And some research has shown that eating whole grains protects against chronic conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. My husband turned me on to sourdough bread last year when I found that I had a lot of difficulty digesting other wheat breads. There is a problem with whole grain bread that a lot of us don’t know. While whole grain bread is high in potassium, magnesium, iron, vitamin B1, and zinc, the presence of an antinutrient called phytic acid makes it very hard to absorb those nutrients into our bodies. What I love about sourdough bread is that the fermentation process allows for better mineral availability and digestion. I like my sourdough avocado toast during the week, but honey, I am a sandwich girl through and through.

Almond milk

As a person who has suffered from allergies my entire life, I was determined that for the first year of my son’s life that he would only drink plant-based milk. And this was before I was a vegan. Now, my son is ten years old and, for much of his childhood, he has had soy milk at home. About a year ago, my husband and I decided to switch to almond milk. While the protein content is higher with soy milk, almond milk has more fiber (wonderful for lowering blood cholesterol). Almonds are a good source of antioxidants and the milk is high in minerals such as magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium that may influence mood disorders and brain function. Every now and then, I like to drink golden milk made with turmeric and almond milk.

 

Those are some of the good mood foods I enjoy. What do you like?

Five Ways to Calm Your Menstrual Cramps

One of the wonderful things about being a lady is dealing with that time of the month or when Auntie Flow from Red Hills comes for a visit, as they say in my neck of the woods. When I was in my teens and twenties, I absolutely hated that visit. Bloating and lots and lots of cramping. #bigsweatshirtweek. Now, the cramps and bloating are almost non-existent, thank goodness. Unfortunately, for some people managing your menses can be a freaking nightmare that includes severe cramps that may affect your ability to function. This common condition is known as dysmenorrhea and it is underdiagnosed and undertreated. What causes all these cramps are hormonelike substances called prostaglandins, which are usually kept in check by progesterone during much of the monthly cycle. But before menstruation begins, progesterone levels drop and prostaglandin levels increase. The prostaglandins in the menstrual blood trigger the uterus to contract and cramp and that means a cycle of pain. Women with gut-wrenching cramps have more prostaglandins than women who aren’t as affected by them.

Dysmenorrhea is divided into two categories: 1) primary dysmenorrhea, which is menstrual pain without organic disease; and 2) secondary dysmenorrhea where the pain is related to an identifiable disease. So don’t be a hero—if your pain is so severe that you need a medical professional, please, please, do something about it.

There are certain things that I like to do when my auntie likes to come by like applying warm castor oil to my abdomen. Some research indicates that applying a heat wrap for an extended time can relieve pain. Another thing I like to do is to eat more high-calcium and high-magnesium foods right before my period. It has been reported that increasing calcium reduces pain, mood symptoms, and water retention during the menstrual cycle. And magnesium has been effective with reducing dysmenorrhea symptoms. So I pile on my broccoli, lentils, and chickpeas during that time of the month.

Here are some other foods I eat that provide relief from those moody menses:

Carob

Way before I became a vegan, I thought carob was only something that patchouli-smelling hippies ate. This was also before I realized that, deep down inside, I was a patchouli-smelling hippie. I was never really a chocolate aficionado. Don’t get me wrong, I love me some chocolate when the mood strikes but I never really went crazy to get it. So when I passed carob powder one day at the supermarket, I thought why the hell not? Carob is a natural sweetener that looks similar to chocolate but what makes carob so special is that it doesn’t contain the stimulants caffeine and theobromine. Also, carob is high in calcium. What’s more, carob is a good source of vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin B6, folic acid, niacin, iron, and potassium. I like to mix carob powder into protein balls, frothy smoothie-like drinks, and baked goods like this chocolate cake.

 

Nettle

I started drinking nettle tea last year for a relentless case of allergies. As some of you may know, nettle is a potent antioxidant and antimicrobial. Some research suggests that nettle may be effective as a treatment for conditions such as gastrointestinal diseases and rheumatism pains. In addition, nettle contains vitamin A, vitamin B1, potassium, and calcium. I like to kick back with a nice cup of nettle tea when I need to build a defense against those uncomfortable menses moments.

Oats

I have always, always been an oatmeal lover. Back in the day, it would be nothing for me to sit in front of the TV with a plate of oatmeal raisin cookies or enjoy a bowl of instant oatmeal. There is a small controversy over whether or not it is appropriate to eat steel cut oats, rolled oats, or quick-cooking oats. That all boils down to the fact that steel cut oats have a higher cooking time but are lower on the glycemic index than rolled oats and quick-cooking oats. Choose whatever floats your boat. Oats are a gluten-free food but, depending on where it is processed, there may be a possibility of wheat contamination, so always practice caution in terms of the brand you choose if needed. Oats contain magnesium, vitamin B1, fiber, and iron. And some studies have shown that the consumption of oats can significantly lower cholesterol levels. I like to put oats in my chia pudding, muffins, and cookies.

Dill

Dill used to remind me of summers as a kid: barbecues that featured potato salad slathered with mayonnaise and chopped fresh dill with relish. Even back then I had more fondness for the side dishes than all those meat-laden stuff. But dill is more than just a flavoring for your cousin’s salad. This herb is a powerful antioxidant and antimicrobial. Dill is loaded with calcium, manganese, and iron. Some research indicates that dill may be effective as a treatment for gingivitis, indigestion, and menstrual disorders. In fact, a 2014 study showed that dill reduced the pain severity of women who suffered from primary dysmenorrhea. This herb also contains minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium. Even though I’m a vegan now, I do tend to follow tradition and mix a teaspoon of dill in some vegan mayo to top my veggie sausages or falafels.

 

Blackstrap molasses

My husband always talks about my weird taste in food. For example, years ago before I became a vegan or even a vegetarian, I went through this phase where I was growing tired of chicken (I never really liked red meat except for the occasional fast food burger—my, how the tide done turn!). Anyway, I didn’t know what to do to make my meals more interesting so I got the bright idea to use dark molasses as a topping for my grilled chicken. Let’s just say it wasn’t a good idea then. Maybe I didn’t choose the right one because it wasn’t a pleasant experience at all. But later, after much research, I finally figured out the right way to use blackstrap molasses. Molasses is the concentrated and clarified extract of sugar cane that is made by boiling cane juice until most of the water is evaporated. There are three grades of molasses: mild, dark, and blackstrap. The grades can be sulphured or unsulphured. Sulphured molasses are made from young sugar cane that is treated with sulphur dioxide during the extraction process. Not good. We want unsulphured molasses that are made from mature sugar cane with no sulphur added. Blackstrap molasses is the most concentrated form of the sugar cane extract. This sweetener is a great source of B-complex vitamins, calcium, iron, potassium, and magnesium. And please note that this is still sugar, so use it sparingly. I like this brand a lot. I like to drizzle about a teaspoon of molasses on sweet potatoes or combine it with about two and half tablespoons of unsweetened coconut shreds for coconut bacon.

 

These are some of the ways I alleviate monthly cramps. What are some of the ways that help you?